beef

A PhD in Worthwhile R&B: The Dream Mixtape

terius nash

Originally published at Passionweiss


The Dream can’t sing like Usher or dance like Chris Brown, but the music is better. In a genre harvested for disposable singles where performers adopt electronica-lite to crossover, Terius Nash is one of the few doing it differently. His songs are at times lewd, bitter and self-reflective. 

On the Mobb Deep sampling “Cold” from last year’s Royalty: The Prequel EP, Nash’s lover dances to his contemporaries and he’s jealous of their audio seduction. During “Turnt Out,” Dream mentions forgetting to sing in falsetto and throughout “Lake Michigan” admits to being a jaded ex-romantic. Even lighter work like “I Luv Your Girl” and “That’s My Shit” aren’t innocent love songs, but transparent references to Lil Wayne’s relationships with his ex partners. 



Among the assembly line ten-packs, The Dream conveys more than cliché. We’re not talking Shakespearean wordplay, but as 90% of mainstream R&B is more worried about consuming a refined carb than music, Dream’s imperfect personality is necessary.

Production is another of the self-proclaimed Radio Killa’s strengths. When Beyoncé and fellow hit syndicates aren’t tapping Nash's song writing with partner Tricky Stewart, his most interesting work stays in house. The majority of Dream's tracks aren't audio throwaways for a tweenage audience, but compelling finger-snappers. 

His catalogue is an instrumental master class with drums that knock and synths that trigger your internal dancing machine. Terius’ first three albums twisted the influence of R&B demigods with simple romantic themes. Later work is darker and experimental as he hardened his subject matter after two divorces. 


Not shy of exhibiting his influences, Nash is a music student. He’s paid tribute to R Kelly (“12 Play”), reworked lyrics from Ginuwine (“Ghetto”), channelled Prince (many tracks) and mimicked MJ (“Michael.”) Dream's also used enough of the "AY!" ad-lib to make even the most dedicated regionalist wish they were from Hotlanta.

Although his own influence is yet to be properly acknowledged, fellow singers undoubtedly pay attention and he's hinted The Weeknd listened to "Fancy" a bit too closely. Six track EP Crown was released earlier this month ahead of his July full length Crown Jewel. As with all Dream projects, there’s some tracks I’ll be listening to in a few months and some I’ll only return to occasionally. The aforementioned Royalty is the closest he’s come to a perfectly cohesive project with dynamic production, personal references, no unnecessary features and the most tasteful Outkast reference in recent memory. There have been concessions for radio and IV Play suffered from forced guest spots, but there’s rarely a release that doesn’t have a baby-making masterpiece. 

As someone with a PhD in The Dream's music, I've listened to his full catalogue and made the below playlist with my favourite songs. You might want to leave a comment about how a song you like isn’t featured or turn your nose up at R&B, otherwise you can two step with the rest of us.

Download Link

Tickle fights: Drake Versus Common

The supposed “beef” between Common and Drake is hip-hop’s funniest rivalry since Ray J told Fabolous he would hire a bigger man to “stick him in the booty.”

Weeks before the release of his new album The Dreamer/The Believer, cardigan wearing Common humorously claimed he was hip-hop on his latest single Sweet.

The 39 year old vet, known for his modelling work with The Gap, used non-ironic lines including: “You never wanna go against me, you know that man. You too soft for that.”



Despite hurting Drake's feelings and starting the rivalry as marketing for his new album, the 2011 Common is definitely not the same person who infamously shocked Ice Cube with his 1996 diss “The Bitch In Yoo.”

No, this is a different era. This is the Queen Latifah squeezing, knitted scarf and corduroys Common.



Former teen actor Drake, real name Aubrey Graham, has also become synonymous with being soft. Thanks to his emotional rapping style and this photo, and this one, this one, and this one…. oh and this one.

However, the problem isn't if they make terrible songs or even that they are soft. Because who really cares?

It’s the absolute lack of believability that one could actually harm the other. Any anger between the two will result in nothing more than a prolonged tickle fight.

Drake carried on the ridiculousness by releasing his indirect response to Common this week on the new Rick Ross mixtape Rich Forever.

Make you sure you look at his tough guy expression and have a laugh. Is anyone out there taking these guys seriously? Give me a break.


Update: Lovable Lonnie responded and it's as sad as expected. It actually sounds like Common just wanted to be featured on the track with Drake so he made his own remix. 

Who knows if we will see pillow vs marshmallow round 2 or if these two will hug it out already.